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Full title Gulliver's Travels [permalink]
Alternative title Travels into Several Remote Nations of the World, in Four Parts. By Lemuel Gulliver, First a Surgeon, and then a Captain of Several Ships
Language English
Authors Jonathan Swift (author) and Robert DeMaria (introduction)
Publisher Penguin Books
Categories Fantasy, novel, satire and travel
Publication year 2003
Original publication year 1726
ISBN 978-0-14-143949-5 [Amazon, B&N, Abe, Powell's]
Pages 306
Images Back of Gulliver's Travels.Spine of Gulliver's Travels.Front of Gulliver's Travels.
Structure [Toggle visibility]
  • Plates
  • Acknowledgements
  • Introduction
  • Further Reading
  • A Note on the Text

Travels Into Several Remote Nations of the World. In Four Parts. By Lemuel Gulliver

  • Advertisement
  • A Letter from Capt. Gulliver to his Cousing Sympson
  • The Publisher to the Reader
  • The Contents
  • Part I: A Voyage to Lilliput
  • Part II: A Voyage to Brobdingnag
  • Part III: A Voyage to Laputa, Balnibarbi, Luggnagg, Glubbdubdrib and Japan
  • Part IV: A Voyage to the Country of the Houyhnhnms
  • Notes
  • Textual Notes
Full title The Ingenious Gentleman Don Quixote of La Mancha [permalink]
Original title El ingenioso hidalgo don Quijote de la Mancha
Language English
Authors Miguel de Cervantes Saavedra (author) and John Ormsby (translator)
Publisher [e-book: Project Gutenberg]
Categories Novel, parody and satire
Publication year 2004
Original publication year 1605
Synopsis

Part 1

Alonso Quixano is a hidalgo (noble-born gentleman) from La Mancha who spends his time devouring popular romance novels (romance novels back then meant books of chivalry, unlike today). The novel opens with his becoming so obsessed with them that he starts deluding himself into thinking he's a knight-errant, a vagrant knight in shining armor slaying dragons, rescuing princesses, righting wrongs, helping the helpless, and, of course, fighting giants disguised as windmills.

Despite his being well-spoken, and in every sense rational, about this one point of being an old-fashioned knight he is stark raving mad; Don Quixote manages to rationalize (explain away) all his delusions, most of the time relying on a malevolent sage intent on enchanting everything from windmills (giants) to inns (castles) to a barber's water basin (the Helmet of Mambrino).

Very quickly (and later in the novel, often) Don Quixote gets into trouble. He is round and about seeking adventure when he comes upon some traders who are making fun of his beloved Dulcinea del Toboso. Not taking that lightly he engages them in combat, and is soundly beaten. A humble farmer from Quixote's home town, Sancho Panza, takes care of him and after being promised an island to rule over once they are done adventuring, Panza joins Quixote as his trusted squire, always being the sense to Quixote's nonsense.

This is an exceedingly funny novel. There are some scattered bits of seriousness here and there (even a novella quoted — or rather told by one of the characters — mostly in its entirety, taking up three chapters) but whenever Don Quixote re-enters the scene, expect hilarity to ensue.

Part 2

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Review

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